1.) MMRV vaccine

may be given to children from 1 through 12 years of age to protect them from these four diseases.

Two doses of MMRV vaccine are recommended:

  • The first dose at 12 through 15 months of age
  • The second dose at 4 through 6 years of age

 

These are recommended ages. But children can get the second dose up through 12 years as long as it is at least 3 months after the first dose.

Anyone 13 or older who needs protection from these diseases should get MMR and varicella vaccines as separate shots.

MMRV may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/VACCINES/HCP/VIS/VIS-STATEMENTS/MMRV.HTML

2.) Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine: What you need to know

Why get vaccinated?

Vaccination can protect both children and adults from pneumococcal disease.

Pneumococcal disease is caused by bacteria that can spread from person to person through close contact. It can cause ear infections, and it can also lead to more serious infections of the:

  • Lungs (pneumonia),
  • Blood (bacteremia), and
  • Covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis).

Pneumococcal pneumonia is most common among adults. Pneumococcal meningitis can cause deafness and brain damage, and it kills about 1 child in 10 who get it.

Anyone can get pneumococcal disease, but children under 2 years of age and adults 65 years and older, people with certain medical conditions, and cigarette smokers are at the highest risk.

PCV13 Vaccine

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (called PCV13) protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria.

PCV13 is routinely given to children at 2, 4, 6, and 12–15 months of age. It is also recommended for children and adults 2 to 64 years of age with certain health conditions, and for all adults 65 years of age and older. Your doctor can give you details.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/pcv13.html

3.) Meningococcal Vaccination

Vaccines are available that can help prevent meningococcal disease, which is any type of illness caused by Neisseria meningitidis bacteria. There are three types of meningococcal vaccines available in the United States:

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menactra®, Menveo®, and MenHibrix®)
  • Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (Menomune®)

All 11 to 12 year olds should be vaccinated with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine (Menactra® or Menveo®). A booster dose is recommended at age 16 years. Teens and young adults (16 through 23 year olds) also may be vaccinated with a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine. In certain situations, other children and adults could be recommended to get any of the three kinds of meningococcal vaccines.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mening/index.html

4. )HPV (Human Papillomavirus) VIS

Why get vaccinated?

HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with many cancers, including:

  • cervical cancer in females,
  • vaginal and vulvar cancers in females,
  • anal cancer in females and males,
  • throat cancer in females and males, and
  • penile cancer in males.

In addition, HPV vaccine prevents infection with HPV types that cause genital warts in both females and males.

Vaccination is not a substitute for cervical cancer screening. This vaccine does not protect against all HPV types that can cause cervical cancer. Women should still get regular Pap tests.

HPV infection usually comes from sexual contact, and most people will become infected at some point in their life. About 14 million Americans, including teens, get infected every year. Most infections will go away on their own and not cause serious problems. But thousands of women and men get cancer and other diseases from HPV.

HPV vaccine

HPV vaccine is approved by FDA and is recommended by CDC for both males and females. It is routinely given at 11 or 12 years of age, but it may be given beginning at age 9 years through age 26 years.

Most adolescents 9 through 14 years of age should get HPV vaccine as a two-dose series with the doses separated by 6-12 months. People who start HPV vaccination at 15 years of age and older should get the vaccine as a three-dose series with the second dose given 1-2 months after the first dose and the third dose given 6 months after the first dose. There are several exceptions to these age recommendations. Your health care provider can give you more information.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv.html

5.) ZOSTAVAX – the shingles vaccine

Your risk of shingles and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) increases as you get older. CDC recommends that people 60 years old and older get shingles vaccine to prevent shingles and PHN.

Who Should Get Shingles Vaccine?

People 60 years of age or older should get shingles vaccine. They should get the vaccine whether or not they recall having had chickenpox, which is caused by the same virus as shingles. There is no maximum age for getting shingles vaccine.

Even if you have had shingles, you can still receive shingles vaccine to help prevent future occurrences of the disease. There is no specific length of time you must wait after having shingles before receiving shingles vaccine, but generally you should make sure the shingles rash has disappeared before getting vaccinated. The decision on when to get vaccinated should be made with your healthcare provider.

Shingles vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for people aged 50 years and older. However, CDC does not have a recommendation for routine use of shingles vaccine in people 50 through 59 years old. Protection from shingles vaccine lasts about 5 years, so adults vaccinated before they are 60 years old might not be protected later in life when the risk for shingles and its complications are greatest. Adults 50 through 59 years who have questions about shingles vaccine should discuss the risks and benefits with a healthcare provider.

How Well Does Shingles Vaccine Work?

Zostavax®, the shingles vaccine, reduced the risk of shingles by 51% and the risk of post-herpetic neuralgia by 67% based on a large study of more than 38,000 adults aged 60 years or older. Protection from shingles vaccine lasts about 5 years.

While the vaccine was most effective in people 60 through 69 years old, it also provides some protection for people 70 years old and older.

Adults vaccinated before age 60 years might not be protected later in life when the risk for shingles and its complications are greatest.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/public/index.html

6.) Hepatitis A Vaccination

One of the Recommended Vaccines by Disease

Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). Hepatitis A can affect anyone. Vaccines are available for long-term prevention of HAV infection in persons 1 year of age and older. Good personal hygiene and proper sanitation can also help prevent the spread of hepatitis A.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/hepa/index.html

7.) Hepatitis B Vaccination

One of the Recommended Vaccines by Disease

Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The virus, which is called hepatitis B virus (HBV), can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death.

Hepatitis B vaccine is available for all age groups to prevent HBV infection.

Reference: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/hepb/index.html

8.) Influenza (Flu) Vaccine

Why get vaccinated?

Influenza (“flu”) is a contagious disease that spreads around the United States every year, usually between October and May.

Flu is caused by influenza viruses, and is spread mainly by coughing, sneezing, and close contact.

Anyone can get flu. Flu strikes suddenly and can last several days. Symptoms vary by age, but can include:

  • fever/chills
  • sore throat
  • muscle aches
  • fatigue
  • cough
  • headache
  • runny or stuffy nose

Flu can also lead to pneumonia and blood infections, and cause diarrhea and seizures in children. If you have a medical condition, such as heart or lung disease, flu can make it worse.

Flu is more dangerous for some people. Infants and young children, people 65 years of age and older, pregnant women, and people with certain health conditions or a weakened immune system are at greatest risk.

Each year thousands of people in the United States die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.

Flu vaccine can:

  • keep you from getting flu,
  • make flu less severe if you do get it, and
  • keep you from spreading flu to your family and other people.

Reference:https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html